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Welcome to Karen Moyd's Website 

Rigor, Relevance, and Relationships = Results, Graduation, and Beyond

 


Education 101 (Teacher Cadet 1) 
3 college credits through North Greenville University ($100.00)
along with AP/IB dual credit
Class Fee = $30.00

Teacher Cadet Part 2
Regular credit
 admission only with instructor's approval

Marine Science
Honors/Regular Levels

Class Fee = $25.00

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Karen Moyd > Marine Science

Wade Hampton High School

Materials needed for all Marine Science Students

  • 3-Ring Binder with clear plastic outside insertion covering
  • Dividers:  Class notes/Memo Sheets, Current Events, Tests/Quizzes, Activities/Labs
  • Colored pencils and markers
  • Personal pencil sharpener with shaving guard
  • Loose leaf notebook paper
  • Plan white memo paper
  • #2 pencils
  • Black ink pens
  • A copy of the Marine Science Syllabus found below for their level.  The Regular level class is listed first then followed by the Honors outline.



Wade Hampton High School

Marine Science CP 2013-2014 Common Syllabus

 

I. Course Description:

Title: Marine Science CP

Course Number: 322557CW / MARSCI

Credit: 1.000 Duration: SX

Grade Level: 10-12

Prerequisite: Biology 1 CP, Chemistry 1 CP, Science teacher recommendation

 

This course is designed for students interested in furthering their education in a technical college or university setting after graduating high school.   The Marine Science curriculum is formatted to promote an awareness of coastal and marine systems.  This includes the physical and chemical properties, living systems and interrelationships.  This course provides opportunities for student participation in experimentation, dissection, and decision making.  Students will be earning one Carnegie unit as an additional lab science credit for this course provided that Biology and Chemistry have been successfully completed prior to entering the Marine Science course. The National Ocean Literacy standards or essential principals are implemented in this course.

 

II.  Instructional Philosophy:

 

Throughout the class period, the student’s success in production and in self are regarded highly.  Learning activities include cooperative learning, student seat work, project-based learning, teacher-led instruction, and field study exercises with both student-choice and teacher-choice grouping. All students will participate in all activities and any lab exercises. Optimal teaming will be considered according to individual student strengths and weaknesses. Technology will be used when applicable to increase student achievement for weekly current events, presentations, and research essays. The classroom is arranged for seat work and lecture as well as lab tables for group work and projects. Ninety minute classes are structured to allow students to experience an effective mix of activities to hold students’ interest. Inquiry-based learning and critical thinking are priorities daily through discussion and reflective journaling. Individual work task are expected. Demonstrations/modeling will provide group discussion leads.  Videos will enhance visual learner opportunities. Internet and Web quest usage will allow for immediate research. Real world application is a daily objective. Multiple Intelligences are addressed via individual project presentations.  All three modalities of learning are incorporated into the lessons daily through demos/power points, hands-on activities, and discussions.  Positive relationships are set up between teacher, student, and parent through professional communication. 

 

III.  Course Goals/Power Standards:

 

The Ocean Literacy Standards are the focus for this course which include:

7  Essential Principals

1. The Earth has one big ocean with many features.

2. The ocean and life in the ocean shape the features of the Earth.

3. The ocean is a major influence on weather and climate.

4. The ocean makes the Earth habitable.

5. The ocean supports a great diversity of life and ecosystems.

6. The ocean and humans are inextricably interconnected.

7. The ocean is largely unexplored.

 

Marine Science is organized into four main parts.

 A.  Unit 1:  Principles of Marine Science: The first section introduces students to marine biology and related fields of

       science.  Also, included are topics concerning history, scientific method, seafloor spreading,

       tsunamis, hydrothermal vents and island/volcano formation.

                        Essential Principals:  1, 2, 3, 6, 7

 BUnit 2:  Chemical and Physical Features of the World Oceans: This includes a survey of all water sources on

       Earth, salinity, temperature, density dissolved gas, and pressure within the ocean and their

       interdependencies, hurricane formation, El Nino, current patterns, and tidal changes.

                        Essential Principals:  2, 3, 4, 7,

 CUnit 3:  Life in the Marine Environment: The third section consists of the nature of life and the sea.  A review of

      cellular organization and life requirements begins this unit, followed by adaptive measures of animals in the

      sea and classification.  An overview of the various marine habitats such as:  tidal zones, estuaries, coral

      reefs, kelp forest, deep sea and open waters or epipelagic regions are discussed. The students will then

      study the major groups of marine organisms according to complexity through a series of dissections. 

                        Essential Principals:  2, 4, 5, 6

D.  Unit 4:  The Ocean and Human Affairs:  The fourth area a study of this class will demonstrate ways that humans

      interact with the world ocean.  This includes natural resources available, economic and environmental

      impact via commercial usage as well as recreational, cultural development in and around and the sea,

      career development and real time data production, coastal management, safety, and human’s pollution of oil,

      sewage, synthetic chemicals, heavy metals, thermal, and solid waste and its negative impact and

      repercussions within our ocean. 

                        Essential Principals:  4, 5, 6, 7

 

IV.  COURSE GOALS / LITERACY STANDARDS:

These standards are based on Common Core Reading and Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technology.

1.        TSW design and complete a multi-step laboratory experiment and analyze the results to write a detailed and thorough conclusion.

2.        TSW read various informational texts (including research articles) to compare and contrast information relevant to the unit of study.

 

 

 

 

V. Major Course Assignments and Projects

Power Standard/ Ocean Literacy or

Literacy Standard

 

Unit Title

 

Major and Minor Assignments or Projects

 

Description

OL = 1, 2, 3, 6, 7

Both Literacy Standards

Principles of Marine Science

·          Current Events Weekly

 

·          Overview Poster Project

 

 

·          Students will report weekly on a current issue concerning the ocean.

·          Students reflect on prior knowledge and use books and the internet to research specific items and produce a visual of the represented findings.

 

.

OL = 2, 3, 4, 5

Both Literacy Standards

Chemical and Physical Features of the World Oceans

·          % of water on Earth Activity

 

 

·          Hydrometer Lab

 

 

 

 

·          Students discover the usable and unusable water sources provided by Earth and make suggestions for conservation.

·          Students make a hydrometer instrument and then use it in several lab activities

OL = 2, 4, 5, 6

Both Literacy Standards

Life in the Marine Environment

·          Simulated Cell Lab

 

 

·          Box of Creatures Activity

 

·          Dissections: clam, squid, sea cucumber, sea star, sea urchin, perch, shark (pregnant).

·          Necropsy of Dolphin Lab

 

 

 

 

·          Students use gummy bears to demonstrate hypo, hyper, and isotonic solutions.

·          Students analyze an assortment of sea life animal parts and classify them according to phyla.

·          Students dissect specimens and compare phyla.

 

 

·          Using technology students, students analyze and read the necropsy report of a deceased bottlenose dolphin and hypothesize the reason for its demise.

 

 

OL =4,  5, 6, 7

Both Literacy Standards

The Ocean and Human Affairs

·          Oceanic Career Project

 

·          Students will research one career in Marine science and produce a a “Help Wanted” flyer.

 

 

 

VI. Course Assessment and Grading Plan:

Quarter Grade: (Determined by the weighted average of assessments during the quarter)  The assessments are classified as a minor assessment or major assessment. 

                        Major Assessments: 60%

                                                Major Lab exercises and Major Projects : Graded at teacher’s discretion.

                                                Unit test : Based on content provided, laboratory work, and literacy covered in each

                                                unit.  Each test includes a variety of matching test questions (40%) along with

                                                application/analysis/synthesis /evaluative short answer and essay items (60%).

Minor Assessments: 40%

                        Includes:  Weekly current events, short activities, small projects, quizzes, “What is it?”                

Mid-term:  Will cover 1st/3rd quarter material.  Will be weighted the same as a Unit Test.

Final Course Grade: First Quarter Grade (40%), Second Quarter Grade (40%), Final Exam Grade (20%)

 

VII.  Required and Recommended Readings:

·          Castro, Peter and Michael E. Huber.  Marine Biology.  Second Edition.  Boston:               WCB/ Mcgraw-Hill, 1997

·          Weekly current events using National Geographic, Discover, Smithsonian, and internet

 

 

VI11.  Course Pacing Guide

                        The course-pacing guide is arranged for a 4x4 block schedule with a 90 minute class

Unit 1

Principles of Marine Science

4.5 weeks

Aug-Sept/Jan-Feb

Unit 2

Chemical and Physical Features of the World Oceans

4.5 weeks

Oct/March

Unit 3

Life in the Marine Environment

4.5 weeks

Nov/ April-May

Unit 4

The Ocean and Human Affairs

4.5 weeks

Dec – Jan/May-June

 

 

 

 

 

Wade Hampton High School

Marine Science Honors 2013-2014 Common Syllabus

 

I. Course Description:

Title: Marine Science Honors

Course Number: 322503HW / MARSCHIH

Credit: 1.000 Duration: SX

Grade Level: 10-12

Prerequisite: Biology 1 Honors, Chemistry 1 Honors and Science teacher recommendation

 

This course is designed for students interested in furthering their education in a university setting after graduating high school.    The Marine Science curriculum is formatted to promote an awareness of coastal and marine systems.  This includes the physical and chemical properties, living systems, and interrelationships with human impact on the sea as a focus.  This course provides opportunities for student participation in research on topics such as: overfishing, endangered species, legislation, environmental management of shorelines, etc. , experimentation, dissection, field studies, and problem solving with decision making.  Students will be earning one honors Carnegie unit as an additional lab science credit for this course.  The National Ocean Literacy standards or essential principals are implemented in this course.

 

II.  Instructional Philosophy:

 

 Learning activities include cooperative learning, student seat work, project-based learning, teacher-lead instruction, and field study exercises with both student-choice and teacher-choice grouping. All students will participate in all activities and any lab exercises. Optimal teaming will be considered according to individual student strengths and weaknesses. Technology will be used when applicable to increase student achievement for weekly current events, presentations, and research essays. The classroom is arranged for seat work and lecture as well as lab tables for group work and projects. Ninety minute classes are structured to allow students to experience an effective mix of activities to hold students’ interest. Inquiry-based learning and critical thinking are priorities daily through discussion and reflective journaling. Individual work task are expected. Demonstrations/modeling will provide group discussion leads.  Videos will enhance visual learner opportunities. Internet and Web quest usage will allow for immediate research. Real world application is a daily objective. Multiple Intelligences are addressed via individual project presentations.  All three modalities of learning are incorporated into the lessons daily through demos/power points, hands-on activities, and discussions.  Positive relationships are set up between teacher, student, and parent through professional communication

 

III.  Course Goals/Power Standards:

 

The Ocean Literacy Standards are the focus for this course which include:

7  Essential Principals

1. The Earth has one big ocean with many features.

2. The ocean and life in the ocean shape the features of the Earth.

3. The ocean is a major influence on weather and climate.

4. The ocean makes the Earth habitable.

5. The ocean supports a great diversity of life and ecosystems.

6. The ocean and humans are inextricably interconnected.

7. The ocean is largely unexplored.

 

Marine Science is organized into four main parts.

 A.  Unit 1:  Principles of Marine Science: The first section introduces students to marine biology and related fields of

       science.  Also, included are topics concerning history, scientific method, seafloor spreading,

       tsunamis, hydrothermal vents and island/volcano formation.

                Essential Principals:  1, 2, 3, 6, 7

 BUnit 2:  Chemical and Physical Features of the World Oceans: This includes a survey of all water sources on

       Earth, salinity, temperature, density dissolved gas, and pressure within the ocean and their

       interdependencies, hurricane formation, El Nino, current patterns, and tidal changes.

                Essential Principals:  2, 3, 4, 7,

 CUnit 3:  Life in the Marine Environment: The third section consists of the nature of life and the sea.  A review of

      cellular organization and life requirements begins this unit, followed by adaptive measures of animals in the

      sea and classification.  An overview of the various marine habitats such as:  tidal zones, estuaries, coral

      reefs, kelp forest, deep sea and open waters or epipelagic regions are discussed. The students will then

      study the major groups of marine organisms according to complexity through a series of dissections. 

                Essential Principals:  2, 4, 5, 6

D.  Unit 4:  The Ocean and Human Affairs:  The fourth area a study of this class will demonstrate ways that humans

      interact with the world ocean.  This includes natural resources available, economic and environmental

      impact via commercial usage as well as recreational, cultural development in and around and the sea,

      career development and real time data production, coastal management, safety, and human’s pollution of oil,

      sewage, synthetic chemicals, heavy metals, thermal, and solid waste and its negative impact and

      repercussions within our ocean. 

                Essential Principals:  4, 5, 6, 7

 

IV.  COURSE GOALS / LITERACY STANDARDS:

These standards are based on Common Core Reading and Writing Standards for Literacy in Science and Technology.

1.     TSW design and complete a multi-step laboratory experiment and analyze the results to write a detailed and thorough conclusion.

2.     TSW read various informational texts (including research articles) to compare and contrast information relevant to the unit of study.

 

 

 

 

V. Major Course Assignments and Projects

Power Standard/ Ocean Literacy or

Literacy Standard

 

Unit Title

 

Major and Minor Assignments or Projects

 

Description

OL = 1, 2, 3, 6, 7

Both Literacy Standards

Principles of Marine Science

·          Current Events Weekly

 

·          Overview Poster Project

 

 

 

·          Research Project

 

·          Students will report weekly on a current issue concerning the ocean.

·          Students reflect on prior knowledge and use books and the internet to research specific items and produce a visual of the represented findings.

 

·          Students will select from a provided list of research topics and write a paper using real time data and then orally present their information.

OL = 2, 3, 4, 5

Both Literacy Standards

Chemical and Physical Features of the World Oceans

·          % of water on Earth Activity

 

 

·          Hydrometer Lab

 

 

·          Electrolysis of Water

 

·          Students discover the usable and unusable water sources provided by Earth and make suggestions for conservation.

·          Students make a hydrometer instrument and then use it in several lab activities.

·          Students design a device from which they separate hydrogen from oxygen.

OL = 2, 4, 5, 6

Both Literacy Standards

Life in the Marine Environment

·          Simulated Cell Lab

 

 

·          Box of Creatures Activity

 

·          Dissections: clam, squid, sea cucumber, sea star, sea urchin, perch, shark (pregnant).

·          Necropsy of Dolphin Lab

 

 

 

·          Biopoem

·          Students use gummy bears to demonstrate hypo, hyper, and isotonic solutions.

·          Students analyze an assortment of sea life animal parts and classify them according to phyla.

·          Students dissect specimens and compare phyla.

 

 

·          Using  technology students, students analyze and read the necropsy report of a deceased bottlenose dolphin and hypothesize the reason for  its demise.

·          Students reflect upon all the phyla and select one oceanic animal with which they create a biopoem and illustrate the animal.

 

 

 

OL =4,  5, 6, 7

Both Literacy Standards

The Ocean and Human Affairs

·          Newsletter Project

 

 

·          Glider Project

 

 

·          ROV Project

·          Students research several current oceanic human concerns and produce an informative newsletter.

·          Students witness a oceanic glider and then design and test one on their own.

·          Students design and build an ROV that will pick up washers

 

 

VI. Course Assessment and Grading Plan:

Quarter Grade: (Determined by the weighted average of assessments during the quarter)  The assessments are classified as a minor assessment or major assessment. 

                Major Assessments: 60%

                                Major Lab exercises and Major Projects : Graded at teacher’s discretion.

                                Unit test : Based on content provided, laboratory work, and literacy covered in each

                                unit.  Each test includes a variety of matching test questions (40%) along with

                                application/analysis/synthesis /evaluative short answer and essay items (60%).

Minor Assessments: 40%

                Includes:  Weekly current events, short activities, small projects, quizzes, “What is it?”     

Mid-term:  Will cover 1st/3rd quarter material.  Will be weighted the same as a Unit Test.

Final Course Grade: First Quarter Grade (40%), Second Quarter Grade (40%), Final Exam Grade (20%)

 

VII.  Required and Recommended Readings:

·          Castro, Peter and Michael E. Huber.  Marine Biology.  Second Edition.  Boston:                  WCB/ Mcgraw-Hill, 1997

·          Weekly current events using National Geographic, Discover, Smithsonian, and internet

 

 

VI11.  Course Pacing Guide

                The course-pacing guide is arranged for a 4x4 block schedule with a 90 minute class

Unit 1

Principles of Marine Science

4.5 weeks

Aug-Sept/Jan-Feb

Unit 2

Chemical and Physical Features of the World Oceans

4.5 weeks

Oct/March

Unit 3

Life in the Marine Environment

4.5 weeks

Nov/ April-May

Unit 4

The Ocean and Human Affairs

4.5 weeks

Dec – Jan/May-June


Marine Science Honors Research Paper/Project

  Due Monday April 28, 2014 (NO LATES ACCEPTED!)  We will work in the classroom for 1 day on the project only.  (Thursday January 30)  The remaining time is on your on time away from school.  There will be periodic turn in portions.   Do not procrastinate!

Written portion

Select a current issue pertaining to the ocean and/or that within it. Type your paper in Arial font and 14 point.  Your name and date and title will be the footer and header.  You will need 3-5 sources noted on a separate page attached to your paper

Paragraph 1:  due Thursday Jan. 30, 2014

·         Opening general statement in reference to your topic 

·         Brief explanation on why this topic is important to study

·         Detailed statement of your investigation

Paragraphs 2-6:

·         2.  Explain in details what research you are reporting on

·         3.  Provide the background on the scientists (You will email the scientist   

            and visit their website.  Most scientists are very busy and will not respond to

            an email from students and  will refer you to their website.  Print out the email showing proof that you

            sent it for  a daily grade.) Due:  Friday Feb. 7, 2014

·         4.  Provide real time data from scientists’ research

·         5.  Explain why you are interested in this topic

·         6.  Explain how you/others might help to increase awareness of this research and

           the need for awareness and explain how humans are helping /hurting in this endeavor.

Paragraph 7:

·         Summarize your findings

·         Provide your opinion about the research

·         Provide a single general statement in reference to the oceanic project

Class Presentation

You will have 3-5 minutes to convey your findings of the project to the class in a knowledgeable fashion and be prepared to answer questions.  You will need to produce a visual teaching tool to aid you in your explanation.   You may use a PowerPoint for pictures/ diagrams/video clips (no longer than 2 min.), but you must not type words to be read while you are presenting. You will also need an interactive tool which will involve every student in your lesson.

Rubric:  This project will count 2 major test grades:  one for the paper and presentation and the second from a test on all presentations.

 

Item

Points available

Points awarded

Typed Arial 14 pt with header

5

 

Grammar, Spelling, Punctuation, Flow, Word choice (no contractions or general type words: things, stuff, a lot, )

7

 

Paragraph 1

9

 

Paragraph 2

9

 

Paragraph 3

9

 

Paragraph 4

9

 

Paragraph 5

9

 

Paragraph 6

9

 

Paragraph 7

9

 

Presentation with visual

Item

Points available

Points earned

Interest Level held

2

 

Adequate visual/interactive

6

 

Neatness/organization

4

 

Knowledge of Speaker

8

 

20

 

Bibliography (MLA)  3-5

5